A behind-the-scenes look at Practical Horseman’s debut podcast with the legendary George Morris.

“I’ve never been the best rider. I’ve never been a Nick Skelton. I’ve never been a McLain. I’ve never been a Kent. Never. But I never lowered my standards with horsemanship. And that’s my secret.”—George Morris

I arrived in West Palm Beach, Florida, and headed straight from the airport to George Morris’ home in Wellington in early January to interview him for Practical Horseman’s new podcast. I was nervous for two reasons: First, even though George and I have worked together on stories and other editorial projects for 24 years, I am still in awe of him and don’t want to make any silly mistakes. Second, George was only my second podcast interview, so the process and the equipment were still new to me.

Shortly after 5 p.m., George, a world-renowned hunter/jumper rider, trainer, and coach, invited me into a den-like room off the kitchen that had built-in shelves filled with books, many of them riding books, he later said. Also on the walls as well as on various side tables were photographs of the many horses in his life and a who’s who in the riding world of his mentors, contemporaries and students. In hindsight, I wish I’d spent more time looking at the photos, but I was trying to be mindful of George’s time.

 
George Morris riding Game Cock at the Ox Ridge Hunt Club. In 1952, with Game Cock, George was the youngest rider ever to win both the AHSA Hunt Seat Medal and ASPCA Maclay Finals. 
 

George Morris riding Game Cock at the Ox Ridge Hunt Club. In 1952, with Game Cock, George was the youngest rider ever to win both the AHSA Hunt Seat Medal and ASPCA Maclay Finals.

Courtesy, George Morris

Follow the link to read more;

https://practicalhorsemanmag.com/podcast/practical-horseman-podcast-george-morris

George riding Rio to the win in the Grand Prix of Calgary, the du Maurier, in 1988. 

George riding Rio to the win in the Grand Prix of Calgary, the du Maurier, in 1988.